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Creating a Kafka Cluster with Confluent

Hands-On Lab

 

Photo of Will Boyd

Will Boyd

DevOps Team Lead in Content

Length

00:30:00

Difficulty

Intermediate

With this hands-on lab, we will have the opportunity to install and configure a three-broker cluster using Confluent Community. We will start with three regular Ubuntu servers and build a working Kafka cluster. Kafka is a powerful tool for messaging and data stream processing. On top of this, Confluent offers additional features and immensely simplifies some aspects of the installation process for Kafka.

What are Hands-On Labs?

Hands-On Labs are scenario-based learning environments where learners can practice without consequences. Don't compromise a system or waste money on expensive downloads. Practice real-world skills without the real-world risk, no assembly required.

Creating a Kafka Cluster with Confluent

Introduction

In this lab, we will have the opportunity to install and configure a three-broker cluster using Confluent Community. We will start with three regular Ubuntu servers and build a working Kafka cluster.

Solution

Begin by logging in to the lab servers using the credentials provided on the hands-on lab page:

ssh cloud_user@PUBLIC_IP_ADDRESS

Install the Confluent Community Package on Broker Nodes

  1. On all three nodes, add the GNU Privacy Guard (GPG) key plus package repository.
  2. Install Confluent Community and Java. The format should look like this:

    wget -qO - https://packages.confluent.io/deb/5.2/archive.key | sudo apt-key add -
    
    sudo add-apt-repository "deb [arch=amd64] https://packages.confluent.io/deb/5.2 stable main"
    
    sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install -y openjdk-8-jre-headless confluent-community-2.12

Configure ZooKeeper

  1. On all three nodes, edit the hosts file:

    sudo vi /etc/hosts
  2. Add the following entries to the hosts file:

    10.0.1.101 zoo1
    10.0.1.102 zoo2
    10.0.1.103 zoo3
  3. Edit the zookeeper config file:

    sudo vi /etc/kafka/zookeeper.properties
  4. Delete the contents of the config file and replace them with the following:

    tickTime=2000
    dataDir=/var/lib/zookeeper/
    clientPort=2181
    initLimit=5
    syncLimit=2
    server.1=zoo1:2888:3888
    server.2=zoo2:2888:3888
    server.3=zoo3:2888:3888
    autopurge.snapRetainCount=3
    autopurge.purgeInterval=24
  5. Set up the zookeeper ID for each server:

    sudo vi /var/lib/zookeeper/myid
  6. On each server, set the contents of /var/lib/zookeeper/myid to the server's ID. On Node 1, enter 1, on Node 2, enter 2, and lastly on Node 3, enter 3:

    <server id 1, 2, or 3>

    Configure Kafka

  7. Edit the kafka config file:

    sudo vi /etc/kafka/server.properties
  8. Edit the broker.id and zookeeper.connect in the config file. Set the broker ID to the appropriate ID for each server (1 on Node 1, 2 on Node 2, and so on).

  9. Set zookeeper.connect to zoo1:2181:

    broker.id=<server id 1, 2, or 3>
    ...
    zookeeper.connect=zoo1:2181

Start ZooKeeper and Kafka

  1. Get the ZooKeeper and Kafka services started, plus enable them:

    sudo systemctl start confluent-zookeeper
    sudo systemctl enable confluent-zookeeper
    sudo systemctl start confluent-kafka
    sudo systemctl enable confluent-kafka
  2. Both services should be active (running) on all three servers. Check the services to make sure that they are running:

    sudo systemctl status confluent*
  3. We can test our cluster by listing the current topics:

    kafka-topics --list --bootstrap-server localhost:9092
  4. Since we have not created any topics yet, we will only see a default topic. The output should look like this:

    _confluent.support.metrics

Conclusion

Congratulations - you've completed this hands-on lab!