LPIC-1: System Administrator – Exam 102 (v5 Objectives)

Course

November 12th, 2018

Intro Video

Photo of Kenny Armstrong

Kenny Armstrong

Linux Training Architect II in Content

Kenny first encountered Solaris UNIX while I was in the military, and found out about Linux through the grapevine. He has worked with Linux in local government, fortune 500 companies, educational institutions, and by providing training. I have received Linux certifications from LPI, CompTIA, and Red Hat. Kenny has been working with Linux for nearly two decades and is passionate about sharing his knowledge with others about the system, and strives to learn more about the operating system every day.

Length

19:41:12

Difficulty

Intermediate

Course Details

Continuing on from our previous Linux+ and LPIC-1: System Administrator - Exam 101 course, we complete the objectives for the LPIC-1 exam. We will cover the content that is tested under the Exam 102-500 test that will be released in the Fall of 2018.

NOTE: This course is for EXAM 102-500, which will replace the 400 series in early 2019!

Syllabus

Introduction

About This Course

Course Introduction

00:03:54

Lesson Description:

This video provides an introduction to the course and the topics we will cover. We'll discuss who this course is designed for, the necessary course prerequisites, and how the LPIC 102-500 exam is organized.

About the Author

00:00:49

Lesson Description:

Before you get started on the course, get to know your instructor!

Important Information about LPI Exam Discount Vouchers for 2019

00:01:24

Lesson Description:

Please view the following video for important information regarding LPI exam vouchers for 2019.

How to Use the Linux Academy Cloud Playground for this Course

00:06:10

Lesson Description:

This video provides an initial walkthrough on how to access and use Linux Academy's new Cloud Playground. The new service has replaced our now deprecated "Cloud Servers" platform. It is important to note that some videos in this course may use/refer to the old "Cloud Servers" platform, so here are a few important notes to remember and use:_1) If you see the instructor using (and/or telling you to use) login credentials such as "user" or "linuxacademy" AND the password "123456" - they will no longer work. Use the specific credentials provided to you (for the server you are using) in the new Cloud Playground user interface. 2) You cannot log into the Cloud Playground servers as the root user. However, you can access the root shell by using the command sudo -i. NOTE: In this course, you may see the instructor running commands as the root user. In order to follow along with those commands, you must run the sudo -i command first. Otherwise, you will get a permissions error.3) To access the servers GUI (if you provisioned a distribution that has one), you need to select "Actions" then "Graphical Shell" for your server in the Cloud Playground. NOTE: You cannot access the GUI via VNC Viewer as port 5901 is blocked. Detailed documentation on the new Cloud Playground can be found here: https://support.linuxacademy.com/hc/en-us/articles/360019096651-Cloud-Playground-FAQ

105: Shells and Shell Scripting

105.1 Customize and Use the Shell Environment

Setting Up the Shell Environment

00:10:53

Lesson Description:

This lesson discusses the differences between the interactive login shell and the interactive non-login shell. We will look at the configuration files that make up these two environments and the order in which they are loaded. Knowing the differences between these two types of shell environments is important for Linux system administrators and anyone using automated deployment tools. For more details on Bash Startup Files, see: http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/view/svn/postlfs/profile.html

Customizing the Shell Environment

00:16:09

Lesson Description:

This lesson reviews some of the Bash modification commands from the LPIC-1 Exam 101 course, such as env, set, unset, and export. We will also introduce some new commands that you will need to know for the exam, such as alias and function. We will also discuss the importance of the PATH environment variable. You'll learn how to make your own commands and have them available when you start a new shell.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

01:30:00

105.2 Customize or Write Simple Scripts

Basic Shell Scripts

00:13:04

Lesson Description:

This lesson is an introduction to the structure of a Bash shell script. We will go over how to create a script and run it from any directory on your system. We will also discuss using arguments in your shell scripts to make them more flexible.

Adding Logic to Your Shell Scripts

00:24:21

Lesson Description:

This lesson focuses on how to use if/else/elif statements for logical command executions in scripts. We will explore some of the different ways to set up an if statement and test for different conditions. Understanding how the if test works in Bash will not only help you on the exams, but also broaden the capabilities of your Bash scripts.

Bash Loops and Sequences

00:19:34

Lesson Description:

We'll wrap up this section on Bash scripting by introducing loops, sequences, and command substitution. We'll discuss the for, while, and until loops and how they differ from each other. We will also talk about some of the commands that we can use to troubleshoot scripts. Finally, we will work with the exit and exec commands, which can provide extra information for sections of our scripts.

106: User Interfaces and Desktops

106.1 Install and Configure X11

The Basics of X11

00:04:48

Lesson Description:

This lesson introduces you to the basics of the X11 server and how it is used in Linux systems. We will also take a quick look at Wayland, which is the future replacement for the X Window System.

Installing X11

00:10:00

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we'll perform a basic X11 installation on an older CentOS 5 system to get a feel for the components that make up the X Window System. We will look at the various ways to start the desktop environment. We will also discuss the importance of the display manager. Please use this link to download an image of Centos 5: https://s3.amazonaws.com/linuxacademy-lab-files/LPIC-1+Exam+102+System+Administrator/CentOS+5+Image/CentOS-5.vdi

X11 Configurations

00:09:34

Lesson Description:

This lesson will introduce you to the xorg.conf configuration file. We will look at the various components that make up this file, and we will see how modern distributions handle X11 configurations. We will also learn how to create a new X11 configuration and query our X server for display information.

Remote Graphical Connections

00:15:01

Lesson Description:

This lesson focuses on how to use the network-aware capabilities of the X server to view application windows on a remote system. We will discuss the security implications of this type of configuration and the techniques used to secure it. We will also discuss using VNC to control a full desktop environment remotely, as well as introduce the newer SPICE protocol.

106.2 Graphical Desktops

The Primary Linux Desktop Environments

00:06:31

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we'll take a whirlwind tour of some of the most popular Linux desktop environments. We will discuss some of their differences and what they all have in common. We'll talk about the GNOME desktop (which we've seen in this course before) as well as introduce you to the KDE and XFCE desktops.

106.3 Accessibility

Assistive Technologies on the Linux Desktop

00:08:39

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we will discuss the assistive technologies that are available in the Linux desktop, such as the high-contrast and large text size settings designed to help visually impaired users. We will also look at keyboard and mouse pointer modifications, as well as a few other features designed to assist users with special needs.

107: Administrative Tasks

107.1 Manage User and Group Accounts and Related System Files

Adding and Removing Users

00:07:00

Lesson Description:

This lesson focuses on how to create new users on Linux systems and modify some of their environment settings at the same time. We will discuss how to set passwords and temporary passwords for new users. We will also look at how to remove a user from a Linux installation.

Adding and Removing Groups

00:04:31

Lesson Description:

Now that we've learned how to add and remove individual users, we'll take a look at adding and removing groups. Group management is an important method of organizing users and what they have access to. We will discuss how to add and remove groups from a system as well as how to view group membership.

User and Group Configuration Files

00:12:21

Lesson Description:

Now that we know how to create accounts, let's take a look at where account information is stored. We will look at the flat database files that contains this information: /etc/passwd, /etc/shadow, and /etc/group. We will also look at some configuration files that help us create new user accounts, and we will use the getent utility to query for user or group information.

User and Group Modifications

00:11:13

Lesson Description:

We'll finish this section on working with local user and group accounts by modifying accounts that are on the system. We will look at modifying users, groups, and user passwords with the usermod, groupmod, and chage commands.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

01:00:00

107.2 Automate System Administration Tasks by Scheduling Jobs

Cron

00:10:09

Lesson Description:

Ready to get your computer to perform tasks for you automatically on a schedule of your choosing? This lesson looks at cron jobs, which are tasks that we can configure ahead of time and have them repeat for us on a set schedule. We will discuss where these jobs are stored and take a look at the system's scheduled jobs. We will also learn how to prevent users from utilizing crontabs if your local policy does not allow them.

At

00:05:50

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we will take a look at the at command and the utilities that we can use to manage it. While the cron daemon is used to schedule jobs and tasks that we want repeated on our system, we use the at command to schedule jobs that will take place at a later time and will run only once. Just as we did with the cron daemon, we will also look at how to control access to the at queue.

Systemd Timer Unit Files

00:09:03

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we will take a look at the newest entry in managing timed job execution: the systemd timer unit. You may want to brush up on your systemd knowledge from the LPIC-101 Exam 101 course if you need to, as this topic will delve into what goes into the systemd timer unit files. We will discuss how these files are created and what differentiates them from at or cron jobs.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

01:00:00

107.3 Localization and Internationalization

Working with the System's Locale

00:09:45

Lesson Description:

Understanding what a system's locale settings are for and how to change them is an important skill for any Linux system administrator that works with international associates. This lesson will show you how to view a locale's settings and make changes to them according to where the system will be used.

Time and Date on the Linux System

00:08:32

Lesson Description:

Now that we have an understanding of a system's locale, we need to configure the time, date, and time zone settings. This lesson focuses on this part of internationalization and how we can view current settings while making permanent changes to these same settings. As Linux is used worldwide, this is another valuable component of a system administrator's skill set.

108: Essential System Services

108.1 Maintain System Time

Working with Remote Time Servers

00:09:23

Lesson Description:

Now that we understand local system time, we need to learn how to connect our systems to upstream time servers. With the Network Time Protocol (NTP), we can receive accurate updates for the current time. This lesson will show you how to use the classic ntpd daemon and the modern chronyd daemon to synchronize your system's clocks with upstream time servers.

108.2 System Logging

Legacy Logging Systems

00:11:08

Lesson Description:

This lesson discusses the basics of the rsyslog daemon and the types of logs that it is responsible for. We will explore the various methods of viewing these logs and the components of their structure. We will also learn about the logger command and how we can use it in our scripts to send messages to the system's default log.

Rsyslog

00:18:45

Lesson Description:

After our discussion of the legacy rsyslog daemon, we now take a look at how the service is configured. We also explore how to send logs from one server to be stored on another server. After we set this up, we then demonstrate how to modify our log retention through the logrotate daemon and its configuration files.

Introduction to the systemd Journal

00:04:25

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we will learn about the systemd journal. We'll take a look at the configuration file that dictates the behavior of the systemd journal, and we will discuss how to make the journal permanent on our systems. Once we understand the basics of the journal and how it operates, we can start using it to manage logs.

journalctl

00:07:14

Lesson Description:

We'll wrap up this section on Linux system logging by using the journalctl command to view the systemd journal. Since most modern Linux distributions use systemd, it is important to understand how the systemd journal works and how to parse its information with journalctl. We will also look at the methods for making the journal permanent on our system and the different commands that we can use to query the journal.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

00:30:00

108.3 Mail Transfer Agent (MTA) Basics

Basics of a Message Transfer Agent

00:02:21

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we introduce the concept of the Message Transfer Agent (MTA). The MTA is the component of an email system that routes email to its destination. For the LPIC-1 exam, you do not need to know how to install or configure an MTA; you just need to be aware of some common MTAs and their purpose.

Email Forwarding and Aliases

00:09:06

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we'll learn how to set up local email forwarding to send email bound for one user to another. We accomplish this with the /etc/aliases file and the newaliases command. We'll also discuss how to view the email queue and how to use our own local .forward file to forward email messages without the need for root privileges.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

01:30:00

108.4 Manage Printers and Printing

The Common Unix Printing System (CUPS)

00:13:22

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we will take a look at the Common Unix Printing System (CUPS) and learn how we can add and remove printers through the CUPS web interface. We will also see how to use the log files from the web interface and explore the configuration files that makes up a CUPS installation.

The Line Print Daemon

00:09:42

Lesson Description:

This lesson focuses on how to print from the command line using the legacy lpd (Line Print Daemon) tool. We’ll discuss how to manage print jobs and print documents with various options from the command line. The ability to print files from the command line is useful when you need hard copy reports for system audits. On the LPIC-1 exam, you will be expected to know how to manage printers and print jobs from the command line.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

01:30:00

109: Networking Fundamentals

109.1 Fundamentals of Internet Protocols

Networking Fundamentals

00:09:50

Lesson Description:

This lesson will introduce you to the protocols responsible for sending data across networks. We will discuss TCP, UDP, and ICMP. In addition, we will explore the different classes of IP addresses. It is recommended that you review the Basic Networking lesson in the LPI Linux Essentials course prior to viewing this lesson.

Common Networking Services

00:01:33

Lesson Description:

This is a short lesson that lists the common networking services that you need to memorize for the LPIC-1 exam. Download the slide deck from the Downloads section of this course and make sure to memorize the entire list prior to taking the exam.

109.2 Persistent Network Configuration

NetworkManager

00:17:42

Lesson Description:

NetworkManager is the de facto toolset for administering networking connections on modern Linux distributions. In this lesson, we will discuss the nmcli command line utility for NetworkManager and learn how to add and remove connections. We will also explore the versatile ip command and modify our system's hostname with the hostnamectl command.

Legacy Networking Tools

00:04:48

Lesson Description:

Now we will take a look at the legacy networking tools that come with the net-tools package. These include the ifconfig, ifup, ifdown, and route commands. We will learn how to use these commands to view our network connections and modify them.

109.3 Basic Network Troubleshooting

Testing Connectivity

00:10:10

Lesson Description:

This lesson focuses on the ping, traceroute, and tracepath commands for verifying our system's connectivity. We will learn about the differences between each command and how to utilize them for both IPv4 and IPv6 connections. We will also use the older netstat command and newer ss command to view the network ports that our systems are using.

109.4 Configure Client-Side DNS

The Basics of DNS Resolution from Linux

00:12:02

Lesson Description:

DNS is an important aspect of working with systems on a network. We use DNS to translate system hostnames to IP addresses so that our computers know how to communicate with each other. In this lesson, we'll learn about the configuration files that we use in Linux for DNS and hostname resolution, such as /etc/hosts, /etc/resolv.conf, /etc/hostname, and /etc/nsswitch.conf. We will also look at how to query DNS and our local systems to resolve a hostname to an IP address using command line tools such as dig, host, and getent.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

00:30:00

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

00:30:00

110: Security

110.1 Perform Security Administration Tasks

Determine the Current Security State of a System

00:15:58

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we will learn about some of the basic commands that you can use to perform a local security audit on a host. We'll discuss how to use the lsof, w, who, last, and find commands to set up basic system security. We will also look into how to give a user elevated privileges with the sudo command.

Checking Local Network Security

00:05:00

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we'll take another look at the lsof, netstat, and ss commands to view our active network ports. We will also discuss how to use the fuser and nmap commands to check the status of running network services. These commands are helpful for monitoring your system's network security.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

01:00:00

110.2 Set Up Host Security

Securing Local Logins

00:05:28

Lesson Description:

This lesson will review permission information for the main account configuration files. We will also learn how to completely lock down a user's account with the usermod command and the nologin binary.

Securing Network Services

00:15:29

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we'll take a look at some techniques that we can use to help secure our network services. We will discuss using the older xinetd super-server, as well as the modern systemd.socket unit type. We will also look into how we can add an extra layer of security with TCP wrappers.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

01:00:00

110.3 Securing Data with Encryption

GPG

00:15:13

Lesson Description:

In this lesson, we will learn how to encrypt and decrypt files using GPG. We'll go over how to create public keys to send to other users so that they can unlock the files you send them. We will also discuss entropy and random number generation.

SSH

00:14:14

Lesson Description:

The secure shell is one of the most important tools for a Linux system administrator. In this lesson, we'll learn about the various files that you need to know about with the secure shell, as well as how to initiate different types of connections. We will go over an example of key-based authentication and discuss how to open up a remote graphical window from another system on your local computer.

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

01:00:00

Hands-on Labs are real live environments that put you in a real scenario to practice what you have learned without any other extra charge or account to manage.

00:15:00

Conclusion

Course Wrap-Up

Next Steps

00:03:44

Lesson Description:

Congratulations, you made it to the end! This video explains how to register for the LPIC-1 Exam 102-500 test and provides some extra tips to help you study. Good luck on the exam, and I look forward to working with you again in your next course!

LPIC-1 Exam 102 Practice Exam

01:00:00