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Serverless in C#

Serverless in C#

With the announcement of the new C# runtime in AWS Lambda, enterprises are now able to start taking their .NET investment into the world of serverless applications. In this blog post, I want to help you get up and running with .NET Core using the new AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM) transform for AWS CloudFormation. We're going to build a simple "Hello World" API endpoint by deploying a resource in Amazon API Gateway and a C# function in AWS Lambda.

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AWS Announces: C# In Lamba, Step Functions and Lambda@Edge

AWS Announces: C# In Lamba, Step Functions and Lambda@Edge

Amazon announced three major Lambda updates in today's re:Invent keynote: Support for C#, Lambda@Edge and Step Functions, which are basically a way to chain together several Lambda functions into a single workflow. C# Support The move to incorporate C# code into Lambda functionality is something of a shot across Microsoft Azure's bow, but one Microsoft probably anticipated. Microsoft's .NET Core effort, to decouple the .NET Framework from Windows and to open source the project, has been in earnest. Surely Redmond realized, well before it released version 1.0 in late June, that doing so swung the door wide for all other cloud providers to immediately offer .NET language support in all of their services.

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Serverless Architecture

Serverless Architecture

When people aren't talking about Docker and containers, they're usually talking about serverless architecture -- code that runs without servers. How is that possible? Well, technically, the code still runs on servers, but you're not the one in charge of managing them. It's kind of like the cloud, where people just accept that data goes in the cloud and comes back out just the way you requested it. Of course, we know it's not that easy. There's a lot that goes on behind the scene. The same holds true for "serverless" code execution... and it's really cool. How exactly does it work? To explain and illustrate, I'll be talking about AWS Lambda. AWS Lambda allows you to focus on code by completely removing the need to think about servers. You write a function with a specific goal (i.e. insert a value in DynamoDB), you set the correct permissions (i.e. Lambda can write to DynamoDB), and all you have left to do is tell the function when to execute. How does it know when to run? Events. When an event occurs, it automatically triggers your function. Events can be things like user signups, user uploads, updating view counts, and more. These events can come from your applications, like mobile and web applications, or even from Amazon's own services. Available services include Amazon S3, DynamoDB, Kinesis, SNS, Simple Email Service, Cognito, CloudWatch Logs & Events, CloudFormation, and Scheduled Events. As long as you properly configure Lambda and the appropriate service, you can have them working together automatically. That's pretty powerful. Let's take a look at an example:

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