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Posted on 2 years ago by MarkRichmanMarkRichman

We’re here at AWS re:Invent 2018, following all the latest product announcements for you. Here are some highlights from the past day’s news that we’re super excited about, and want to share with you. Amazon EC2 C5n Instances…

Announcing Fullstack Serverless Applications on AWS

Announcing Fullstack Serverless Applications on AWS

I’m excited to announce that my Fullstack Serverless Applications on AWS course is now live on Linux Academy. People who enroll in this course can expect to review some basic concepts related to serverless applications before diving into six hands-on labs, a bunch of supplementary videos, and several quizzes that will help give context and solidify your understanding of how and why we might build a serverless application. In the course, you’ll be making a serverless application for Prometheon Music to use to help manage their music rating system.

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Breakout Bonanza

Breakout Bonanza

So you've decided to go to re:Invent! While it's easy to get distracted with the fun parties, vendors, and the idea of being in Vegas itself, remember the whole point of re:Invent is to learn and advance our AWS prowess, right? There are a tremendous amount of learning opportunities or breakouts to attend – it can seem overwhelming! But let’s first recap some basics: There are three types of breakout content levels: introductory, advanced, and expert; and three different types of content types: sessions, workshops, and chalk talks. Chalk talks are brand new for 2017 and are an interactive hour-long format intended for a more intimate audience. There are also three different content venues: Aria, MGM Grande, and Venetian. re:Invent also has a plethora of session tracks, or topics, such as gaming, artificial intelligence and machine learning, healthcare, and serverless, just to name a few. I decided to ask a couple of my peers on the AWS content team which breakouts they plan on attending and how that is going to shape our content for 2018!

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Fantastic Opportunities Developing in Cloud Computing Careers

Fantastic Opportunities Developing in Cloud Computing Careers

There is a Cloud revolution under way. It has been going on for several years now, but recently, it's significance has increased dramatically. Businesses, both large and small, are driven to the cloud to save costs, access more data, automate, and remain competitive. And as a result, there has been a huge increase in the demand for cloud engineers, cloud developers, and cloud security experts in the last year. Businesses need to hire professionals that have a demonstrated deep knowledge of the latest cloud enabled technologies, such as serverless computing, big data, machine learning, DevOps, functional programming, software controlled networking, IoT, cloud security, and much more.

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An Introduction to Amazon Elastic Beanstalk

An Introduction to Amazon Elastic Beanstalk

Let's start with an important question: What is Elastic Beanstalk? Elastic Beanstalk is a service offered by Amazon which makes it easy to quickly deploy applications using AWS resources. Think about the traditional way of creating an application to deploy on AWS. First, we need to create the infrastructure. Second, we need to create a pipeline to deploy our code to that infrastructure. We also need to make sure that the new code can be deployed to a testing, Q&A, or other environments, before going to production. We have to have the infrastructure for all of those environments, which means we need to have the knowledge and resources to create that infrastructure. What if you're just trying to test a prototype really quickly? What if you don't have any infrastructure engineers on your team? The developers will have to learn how to deploy resources, and how to set up those pipelines. Instead of creating features, they're bogged down in the details. Elastic Beanstalk aims to solve that problem. Using Elastic Beanstalk, we can deploy our code and the service will automatically provision our capacity, set up our load balancing and auto scaling, as well as configure monitoring and anything else necessary to glue it all together.

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AWS and the Internet of Things

AWS and the Internet of Things

IoT has become one of the hot topics of the tech industry. From dedicated sessions at Amazon's re:Invent 2016 to the upcoming Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2017, the term comes up everywhere. IoT refers to an interconnected network of smart devices sending data to the Internet. The list includes your washing machine, A/C thermostat, car, watch, TV and almost anything else that has a 'chip.' By some estimations, there will be 6.4 billion connected devices by the end of 2016, generating $1.4 Billion in revenue and growing [1]. With those revenue projections, it is no surprise that companies like Amazon have already launched their IoT platforms. The Amazon eco-system offers services like Amazon Cognito, AWS Lambda, Amazon Kinesis, Amazon S3, Amazon Machine Learning, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon CloudWatch, AWS CloudTrail, and Amazon Elasticsearch Service with built-in Kibana integration to build IoT applications that gather, process, analyze and act on data generated by connected devices, without having to manage any infrastructure [2]. Pricing for the US East and US West Regions are a flat $5 per one million messages [3].

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Introducing AWS Athena

Introducing AWS Athena

At the re:Invent conference held in Las Vegas in November 2016, Amazon’s CEO announced Athena, among a series of new services. Athena’s specialty is to support interactive queries using SQL over data stored in S3 buckets. What sets it apart from Amazon’s Redshift, used for data analysis on a highly structure data warehouse environment and Amazons EMR, used for data analysis on unstructured data, is Athena’s simplicity and ease of use.

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AWS Announces: CodeBuild Automated Build Management

AWS Announces: CodeBuild Automated Build Management

It's common among many development teams – often larger teams, but especially those using agile project management and continuous deployment – to automate the process of application builds. Depending on the complexity of the software, these builds can be frequent and the resources needed to conduct the builds can be costly if persisted. Orchestrating them is fraught with peril –  many a project has been derailed by the nightly build that failed to fire off – and usually a fair amount of DevOps time is spent managing the build process. Amazon's announcement today of its CodeBuild service takes square aim at these logistical problems, by providing automated build services.

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