Announcing the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator Course – v2.16 for 2016

As many of you already know, on February 2nd of 2016, the Linux Foundation updated their Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator Exam to version 2.16 of their core domains and competencies. Keeping with our close association and partnership with the Linux Foundation, we launched our updated certification preparation course reflecting the new version’s requirement on the same day. Let’s talk a bit about the differences.

Big Changes from Version 1

There are a number of big changes in the core competencies for exam v2.16 as compared to version 1. This exam now covers a wider array of topics at a greater depth than the original. Here are the new sections and their associated weighting in the new test:

  • Essential Commands – 25%
  • Operation of Running Systems – 20%
  • User and Group Management – 15%
  • Networking – 15%
  • Service Configuration – 10%
  • Storage Management – 10%
  • Virtualization – 5%

There are two key changes that you will likely notice. The first is that each section now has a ‘weighting’ percentage next to it. This is the approximate percentage of questions about this topic that will appear in the exam versus the whole. These sections will have a larger number of topics and you will find that the Linux Academy preparation class for this certification has gone from just under three hours of training to almost thirteen as a result. The second difference is a new section not previously covered, virtualization. Although not a point of large focus in the administrator’s exam, the topics in this domain will serve as a gateway into the more advanced Engineer exam overhaul coming at the latter part of this year.

How Do I Prepare?

Obviously, the first step is to take the new course from Linux Academy here. We have updated our course to cover the domains and competencies you will be expected to be familiar with for the 2016 version of the exam. That’s not the only thing we have done to make things easier for you, though.

In addition to the course update with additional content, we have dozens of new exercises that allow you to get your hands on the skills you need. The thirteen hours of content is only for the videos, there are enough exercises for you to practice much, much longer than that!

How to Know When You Are Ready for the Exam

Finally, we have our assessment exam. This takes all of the concepts as covered during the videos and hands-on exercises and rolls them up into a single exam that is evaluated much the same as your official exam will be by the Linux Foundation. See below for a shot of what the assessment looks like:

LFCSA Practice Exam

You will use a Linux Academy lab server in order to complete this exam. Be sure to choose your distribution based on the one you are most confident in when taking your exam. Otherwise, this evaluation is performance based – meaning that you will be asked to do specific tasks and then you will be evaluated on the results. Our assessment engine is geared to be sure you get the right result, no matter how you perform the tasks. At the end, you will see which items you completed correctly and which you need to revisit!

Next Steps

The certification exam requires a score of 74% or higher to pass. The exam itself will be anywhere from 28-50 questions depending on which domains they are drawn from. Since our exam contains over 140 questions, if you score well, you can be confident in your readiness for the exam. If you are new to Linux Academy, now is the time to join. Through the end of March 2016, you can join Linux Academy for only $75 per quarter with the code lfoffer, giving you access to not only the new Linux Foundation course but dozens of others and more than 1900 videos! Start the year off right with Linux Academy, let us help you prepare for the next stage of your career!

Terrence T. Cox

A veteran of twenty years in Information Technology in a variety of roles. He has worked in development, security and infrastructure well before they merged into what we now call DevOps. He provides training in Linux, VMWare, DevOps (Ansible, Jenkins, etc) as well as containers and AWS topics.

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