Skip to main content

Author: DougVanderweide

Azure DocumentDB is Now Cosmos DB: A Global Scale, Flexible NoSQL Database

Azure DocumentDB is Now Cosmos DB: A Global Scale, Flexible NoSQL Database

One of the big announcements at Microsoft Build 2017 is Cosmos DB, a new NoSQL database service from Azure that aims to provide a globally scaled, high-performance NoSQL data store. It's fundamentally a replacement of DocumentDB; or, to be more charitable, an expansion of DocumentDB that adds additional features. Effectively, DocumentDB is now Cosmos DB, with many of the same features and managed in many of the same ways. But the documentation now refers to CosmosDB, not DocumentDB, and you can no longer provision a DocumentDB. Instead, you provision a Cosmos DB. However, you can still query Cosmos DB using the DocumentDB APIs, which are available for the .NET Framework, .NET Core, Java, Node.js, Python and Xamarin.

Read Post
Microsoft Build: Azure Adds Azure Database for MySQL, Azure Database for PostgreSQL

Microsoft Build: Azure Adds Azure Database for MySQL, Azure Database for PostgreSQL

A significant announcement at Microsoft Build 2017 was support for MySQL and PostgreSQL as a service. Both offerings are now in preview.* Azure has technically supported MySQL as a service for several years, through its partner, ClearDB. I'd say it's safe to report that few Azure users were impressed with the offering, which was expensive, especially given its limitations. Last summer, Azure also announced the ability to create MySQL databases within an App Service app, but these were limited to operating within a specific app instance and therefore couldn't scale, couldn't be reached from outside the app and had their performance limited by the capabilities of the App Service instance. So the offering of MySQL as a service from Microsoft itself, as well as PostgreSQL, is a welcome development (pardon the pun), mostly because it promises to be truly scalable, which the ClearDB offering was not, and will overcome the limitations of running databases in App Service instances.

Read Post
About That Steve Ballmer Comment …

About That Steve Ballmer Comment …

Search the Internet for "Microsoft and Linux." Go ahead; open a new tab and run that term through Bing. *rimshot* I'll wait.Notice a common thread? I sure do. Virtually every top result harkens back to 2001, the year that Steve Ballmer is credited with calling Linux "a cancer." For nearly two decades, Microsoft waged a holy war against Linux – I've actually had Microsoft employees tell me that the first thing they learned from Redmond were the evils of open source – until 2015, when Microsoft declared its love of Linux and later went on to join the Linux Foundation. When you consider the circumstances, however, it's not at all surprising.

Read Post
1 2 Next